Afghan Hound Breed Standard/ History

Afghan Hound Breed Standard

Afghan Hound History & Breed Standard

Referred to as an aristocrat, the Afghan Hound’s appearance is one of    dignity and aloofness. Well covered with thick, silky hair, very fine in texture,    the Afghan hound’s coat is a sort found among animals native to high altitudes.    They can come in all colors, and while the breed is an excellent hound (hunting    by sight) its popularity here has been generated by the breeds’ spectacular    qualities as a show dog. 

A Look Back
 The Afghan hound was discovered by the Western World in Afghanistan and surrounding    regions during the 19th century. As the breed developed in Afghanistan, two    distinct types evolved from the southern and western desert regions and the    northern regions. During WWI, the breed literally disappeared in the Western    world. The start of the Afghan Hounds we have today dates back to 1920, when    a group of them was brought to Scotland.

Right Breed for You?
 Known for being aloof, dignified, and for having a highly individualized personality,    Afghan Hounds are prized and loved by their owners as companions and members    of their family. However, it is important to take into account that their coat    requires regular grooming, and their larger size necessitates regular exercise.

If you are considering purchasing an Afghan Hound puppy,    learn more here.

•Hound Group; AKC recognized in 1926.
 •Ideal size ranging from 25 to 27 inches tall at the shoulder and 50 to    60 pounds.
 •Hunting dog; sight hound.
 © The American Kennel Club, Inc.

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Afghan Hound Breed Standard
 Hound Group
 General Appearance
 The Afghan Hound is an aristocrat, his whole appearance one of dignity and aloofness    with no trace of plainness or coarseness. He has a straight front, proudly carried    head, eyes gazing into the distance as if in memory of ages past. The striking    characteristics of the breed-exotic, or "Eastern," expression, long    silky topknot, peculiar coat pattern, very prominent hipbones, large feet, and    the impression of a somewhat exaggerated bend in the stifle due to profuse trouserings-stand    out clearly, giving the Afghan Hound the appearance of what he is, a king of    dogs, that has held true to tradition throughout the ages.

Head
 The head is of good length, showing much refinement, the skull evenly balanced    with the foreface. There is a slight prominence of the nasal bone structure    causing a slightly Roman appearance, the center line running up over the foreface    with little or no stop, falling away in front of the eyes so there is an absolutely    clear outlook with no interference; the underjaw showing great strength, the    jaws long and punishing; the mouth level, meaning that the teeth from the upper    jaw and lower jaw match evenly, neither overshot nor undershot. This is a difficult    mouth to breed. A scissors bite is even more punishing and can be more easily    bred into a dog than a level mouth, and a dog having a scissors bite, where    the lower teeth slip inside and rest against the teeth of the upper jaw, should    not be penalized. The occipital bone is very prominent. The head is surmounted    by a topknot of long silky hair. Ears--The ears are long, set approximately    on level with outer corners of the eyes, the leather of the ear reaching nearly    to the end of the dog's nose, and covered with long silky hair. Eyes--The eyes    are almond-shaped (almost triangular), never full or bulgy, and are dark in    color. Nose--Nose is of good size, black in color. Faults--Coarseness; snipiness;    overshot or undershot; eyes round or bulgy or light in color; exaggerated Roman    nose; head not surmounted with topknot.

Neck
 The neck is of good length, strong and arched, running in a curve to the shoulders    which are long and sloping and well laid back. Faults--Neck too short or too    thick; a ewe neck; a goose neck; a neck lacking in substance.

Body
 The back line appearing practically level from the shoulders to the loin. Strong    and powerful loin and slightly arched, falling away toward the stern, with the    hipbones very pronounced; well ribbed and tucked up in flanks. The height at    the shoulders equals the distance from the chest to the buttocks; the brisket    well let down, and of medium width. Faults--Roach back, swayback, goose rump,    slack loin; lack of prominence of hipbones; too much width of brisket, causing    interference with elbows.

Tail
 Tail set not too high on the body, having a ring, or a curve on the end; should    never be curled over, or rest on the back, or be carried sideways; and should    never be bushy.

Legs
 Forelegs are straight and strong with great length between elbow and pastern;    elbows well held in; forefeet large in both length and width; toes well arched;    feet covered with long thick hair; fine in texture; pasterns long and straight;    pads of feet unusually large and well down on the ground. Shoulders have plenty    of angulation so that the legs are well set underneath the dog. Too much straightness    of shoulder causes the dog to break down in the pasterns, and this is a serious    fault. All four feet of the Afghan Hound are in line with the body, turning    neither in nor out. The hind feet are broad and of good length; the toes arched,    and covered with long thick hair; hindquarters powerful and well muscled, with    great length between hip and hock; hocks are well let down; good angulation    of both stifle and hock; slightly bowed from hock to crotch. Faults--Front or    back feet thrown outward or inward; pads of feet not thick enough; or feet too    small; or any other evidence of weakness in feet; weak or broken down pasterns;    too straight in stifle; too long in hock.

Coat
 Hindquarters, flanks, ribs, forequarters, and legs well covered with thick,    silky hair, very fine in texture; ears and all four feet well feathered; from    in front of the shoulders; and also backwards from the shoulders along the saddle    from the flanks and the ribs upwards, the hair is short and close, forming a    smooth back in mature dogs - this is a traditional characteristic of the Afghan    Hound. The Afghan Hound should be shown in its natural state; the coat is not    clipped or trimmed; the head is surmounted (in the full sense of the word) with    a topknot of long, silky hair - that is also an outstanding characteristic of    the Afghan Hound. Showing of short hair on cuffs on either front or back legs    is permissible. Fault--Lack of shorthaired saddle in mature dogs.

Height
 Dogs, 27 inches, plus or minus one inch; bitches, 25 inches, plus or minus one    inch.

Weight
 Dogs, about 60 pounds; bitches, about 50 pounds.

Color
 All colors are permissible, but color or color combinations are pleasing; white    markings, especially on the head, are undesirable.

Gait
 When running free, the Afghan Hound moves at a gallop, showing great elasticity    and spring in his smooth, powerful stride. When on a loose lead, the Afghan    can trot at a fast pace; stepping along, he has the appearance of placing the    hind feet directly in the foot prints of the front feet, both thrown straight    ahead. Moving with head and tail high, the whole appearance of the Afghan Hound    is one of great style and beauty.

Temperament
 Aloof and dignified, yet gay. Faults--Sharpness or shyness. 

Approved September 14, 1948 

The Afghan Hound was discovered by the    Western World in Afghanistan and surrounding regions during the 19th century,    with the first specimens brought to England in the latter part of that century.    Of the breed's origin and its history prior to then, little is known for certain.    It was once believed that the Afghan Hound existed in Egypt thousands of years    ago, with a second theory that the breed evolved on the steppes of Asia representing    the original sight hound. A great deal of research has not provided proof for    either of these speculations.

As the breed developed in Afghanistan, two distinct types    evolved. Hounds from the southern and western desert regions had a rangy build,    were light in color and sparse in outer coat. The dogs from the northern regions    were more compact in structure, darker in color and more heavily coated. These    and other variations represented logical adaptations to the wide diversity of    climate and terrain of the country.

The breed is primarily a coursing hound, pursuing its    quarry by sight. The Afghan Hound was hunted singly, in dog and bitch pairs,    in packs and combined with specially trained falcons. A tremendously versatile    breed, its quarry included hare, wolves, jackals, marmots and snow leopards.    Because of the variety of game hunted and the diversity of the geography, the    Afghan Hound's most desirable traits were being sure-footed and agile to work    the rugged terrain, strength and speed to bring down prey, plus the stamina    to maintain a strenuous chase for a sustained length of time.

 AKC MEET THE BREEDS®: Afghan Hound
 Referred to as an aristocrat, the Afghan Hound’s appearance is one of    dignity and aloofness. Well covered with thick, silky hair, very fine in texture,    the Afghan hound’s coat is a sort found among animals native to high altitudes.    They can come in all colors, and while the breed is an excellent hound (hunting    by sight) its popularity here has been generated by the breeds’ spectacular    qualities as a show dog.

A Look Back
 The Afghan hound was discovered by the Western World in Afghanistan and surrounding    regions during the 19th century. As the breed developed in Afghanistan, two    distinct types evolved from the southern and western desert regions and the    northern regions. During WWI, the breed literally disappeared in the Western    world. The start of the Afghan Hounds we have today dates back to 1920, when    a group of them was brought to Scotland.

Right Breed for You?
 Known for being aloof, dignified, and for having a highly individualized personality,    Afghan Hounds are prized and loved by their owners as companions and members    of their family. However, it is important to take into account that their coat    requires regular grooming, and their larger size necessitates regular exercise.

If you are considering purchasing an Afghan Hound puppy,    learn more here.

•Hound Group; AKC recognized in 1926.
 •Ideal size ranging from 25 to 27 inches tall at the shoulder and 50 to    60 pounds.
 •Hunting dog; sight hound.
 © The American Kennel Club, Inc.

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Poodle Breed Standard

Poodle History & Breed Standard

Standard Poodle

Non Sporting Group

The Standard for the Poodle (Toy variety) is the same as for the Standard and Miniature varieties except as regards heights. General Appearance: Carriage and Condition - That of a very active, intelligent and elegant appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. Size, Proportion, Substance: Size - The Standard Poodle is over 15 inches at the highest point of the shoulders. Any Poodle which is 15 inches or less in height shall be disqualified from competition as a Standard Poodle. The Miniature Poodle is 15 inches or under at the highest point of the shoulders, with a minimum height in excess of 10 inches. Any Poodle which is over 15 inches or is 10 inches or less at the highest point of the shoulders shall be disqualified from competition as a Miniature Poodle. The Toy Poodle is 10 inches or under at the highest point of the shoulders. Any Poodle which is more than 10 inches at the highest point of the shoulders shall be disqualified from competition as a Toy Poodle. As long as the Toy Poodle is definitely a Toy Poodle, and the Miniature Poodle a Miniature Poodle, both in balance and proportion for the Variety, diminutiveness shall be the deciding factor when all other points are equal. Proportion - To insure the desirable squarely built appearance, the length of body measured from the breastbone to the point of the rump approximates the height from the highest point of the shoulders to the ground. Substance - Bone and muscle of both forelegs and hindlegs are in proportion to size of dog. Head and Expression: (a) Eyes - very dark, oval in shape and set far enough apart and positioned to create an alert intelligent expression. Major fault: eyes round, protruding, large or very light. (b) Ears - hanging close to the head, set at or slightly below eye level. The ear leather is long, wide and thickly feathered; however, the ear fringe should not be of excessive length. (c) Skull - moderately rounded, with a slight but definite stop. Cheekbones and muscles flat. Length from occiput to stop about the same as length of muzzle. (d) Muzzle - long, straight and fine, with slight chiseling under the eyes. Strong without lippiness. The chin definite enough to preclude snipiness. Major fault: lack of chin. Teeth - white, strong and with a scissors bite. Major fault: undershot, overshot, wry mouth. Neck, Topline, Body: Neck well proportioned, strong and long enough to permit the head to be carried high and with dignity. Skin snug at throat. The neck rises from strong, smoothly muscled shoulders. Major fault: ewe neck. The topline is level, neither sloping nor roached, from the highest point of the shoulder blade to the base of the tail, with the exception of a slight hollow just behind the shoulder. Body - (a) Chest deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs. (b) The loin is short, broad and muscular. (c) Tail straight, set on high and carried up, docked of sufficient length to insure a balanced outline. Major fault: set low, curled, or carried over the back. Forequarters: Strong, smoothly muscled shoulders. The shoulder blade is well laid back and approximately the same length as the upper foreleg. Major fault - steep shoulder. Forelegs - Straight and parallel when viewed from the front. When viewed from the side the elbow is 

directly below the highest point of the shoulder. The pasterns are strong. Dewclaws may be removed. Feet - The feet are rather small, oval in shape with toes well arched and cushioned on thick firm pads. Nails short but not excessively shortened. The feet turn neither in nor out. Major fault - paper or splay foot. Hindquarters: The angulation of the hindquarters balances that of the forequarters. Hindlegs straight and parallel when viewed from the rear. Muscular with width in the region of the stifles which are well bent; femur and tibia are about equal in length; hock to heel short and perpendicular to the ground. When standing, the rear toes are only slightly behind the point of the rump. Major fault - cow-hocks. Coat: (a) Quality - (1) Curly: of naturally harsh texture, dense throughout. (2) Corded: hanging in tight even cords of varying length; longer on mane or body coat, head, and ears; shorter on puffs, bracelets, and pompons. (b) Clip - A Poodle under 12 months may be shown in the "Puppy" clip. In all regular classes, Poodles 12 months or over must be shown in the "English Saddle" or "Continental" clip. In the Stud Dog and Brood Bitch classes and in a non-competitive Parade of Champions, Poodles may be shown in the "Sporting" clip. A Poodle shown in any other type of clip shall be disqualified. (1) "Puppy" - A Poodle under a year old may be shown in the "Puppy" clip with the coat long. The face, throat, feet and base of the tail are shaved. The entire shaven foot is visible. There is a pompon on the end of the tail. In order to give a neat appearance and a smooth unbroken line, shaping of the coat is permissible. (2) "English Saddle" - In the "English Saddle" clip, the face, throat, feet, forelegs and base of the tail are shaved, leaving puffs on the forelegs and a pompon on the end of the tail. The hindquarters are covered with a short blanket of hair except for a curved shaved area on each flank and two shaved bands on each hindleg. The entire shaven foot and a portion of the shaven leg above the puff are visible. The rest of the body is left in full coat but may be shaped in order to insure overall balance. (3) "Continental" - In the "Continental" clip, the face, throat, feet, and base of the tail are shaved. The hindquarters are shaved with pompons (optional) on the hips. The legs are shaved, leaving bracelets on the hindlegs and puffs on the forelegs. There is a pompon on the end of the tail. The entire shaven foot and a portion of the shaven foreleg above the puff are visible. The rest of the body is left in full coat but may be shaped in order to insure overall balance. (4) "Sporting" - In the "Sporting" clip, a Poodle shall be shown with face, feet, throat, and base of tail shaved, leaving a scissored cap on the top of the head and a pompon on the end of the tail. The rest of the body, and legs are clipped or scissored to follow the outline of the dog leaving a short blanket of coat no longer than one inch in length. The hair on the legs may be slightly longer than that on the body. In all clips the hair of the topknot may be left free or held in place by elastic bands. The hair is only of sufficient length to present a smooth outline. "Topknot" refers only to hair on the skull, from stop to occiput. This is the only area where elastic bands may be used. Color: The coat is an even and solid color at the skin. In blues, grays, silvers, browns, cafe-aulaits, apricots and creams the coat may show varying shades of the same color. This is frequently present in the somewhat darker feathering of the ears and in the tipping of the ruff. While clear colors are definitely preferred, such natural variation in the shading of the coat is not to be considered a fault. Brown and cafe-au-lait Poodles have liver-colored noses, eye-rims and lips, dark toenails and dark amber eyes. Black, blue, gray, silver, cream and white Poodles have black noses, eye-rims and lips, black or self colored toenails and very dark eyes. In the apricots while 

the foregoing coloring is preferred, liver-colored noses, eye-rims and lips, and amber eyes are permitted but are not desirable. Major fault: color of nose, lips and eye-rims incomplete, or of wrong color for color of dog. Parti-colored dogs shall be disqualified. The coat of a parti-colored dog is not an even solid color at the skin but is of two or more colors. Gait: A straightforward trot with light springy action and strong hindquarters drive. Head and tail carried up. Sound effortless movement is essential. Temperament: Carrying himself proudly, very active, intelligent, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. Major fault: shyness or sharpness. Major Faults: Any distinct deviation from the desired characteristics described in the Breed Standard. Disqualifications: Size - A dog over or under the height limits specified shall be disqualified. Clip - A dog in any type of clip other than those listed under coat shall be disqualified. Particolors - The coat of a parti-colored dog is not an even solid color at the skin but of two or more colors. Parti-colored dogs shall be disqualified. Value of Points  General appearance, temperament, carriage and condition.......30 Head, expression, ears, eyes and teeth.......20 Body, neck, legs, feet and tail.......20 Gait.......20 Coat, color and texture.......10 

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